Wednesday, September 21, 2005

 
I meant to post these back when, but forgot (wonder why?) until memory brought them back this morning:


I received these comments on rejection notes (different ones), all in the month of March of this year:

"While we admired some of the writing, we felt you've left little for the reader to do, little for the imagination."

"These poems are too obscure, portentious, and frequently narcissistic . . . for our contemporary snippy marketplace."

" the linguistic push of these poems needs to be explored more--the tone is flat throughout."


Just thought I'd share.

Comments:
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from "too little for the imagination" all the way to "obscure"? Wow, that's quite a range you have there.

And good grief, "too... frequently narcissistic"? I'd love to know what editor has forgotton how to look in the mirror.
 
Hey, that second comment totally applies to William Blake. You must be on the right path.
 
I will know i'm writing good work, when I get rejetions like that.

Wonderful!
 
Those are great - displeasing different people in different ways, so you know you must be doing something right. I'm waiting to receive the rejection that reads, simply': "Ugh."
 
Hey, at least you GET comments on your rejections :)
 
Well, I guess so.

I do take a perverse pride in occasionally eliciting such responses . . still, I wouldn't have minded a "wow!" instead. Who wouldn't?

& Josh, you write good work. I think.
 
Oh my gosh! What do those even mean?
 
Re: :"... you've left little for the reader to do, little for the imagination."

Maybe the reader in question is just not imaginative enough.

Re: "contemporary snippy marketplace "

Somebody please define what a "contemporary snippy marketplace" is and how the heck you write for one.

Re: " the linguistic push of these poems needs to be explored more..."

Ah yes! Linguistic push as opposed to linguistic pull?
 
what a bunch of assholes.
 
:)
 
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